Behavioral economics is the integration of economic theory and other related disciplines including but not limited to psychology, neuro-science, finance, biology, sociology, anthropology, political science, and law. Behavioral economics is inherently interdisciplinary. The purpose of this interdisciplinary research is to better understand human behavior.

Our unique focus is the implications of behavioral economics for public policy, and a framework for policy makers. Every aspect of behavioral economics and all aspects of public policy are within our purview. We welcome contributions to all fields of knowledge listed above, and beyond, provided they show the public policy implications of behavioral economics.

We are open to a wide range of methodological approaches, provided they lead to scientifically grounded conclusions. Experiments, surveys, meta-analyses, case studies, simulation-based analyses, economic and social theory, randomized control trials, and literature reviews (to name but a few common approaches) are all welcome. Arguments may be based on a variety of theoretical frameworks, including those which do not assume fully rational behavior.

Empirical results should be both theoretically grounded and both economically and statistically significant. However, the math and the tables and graphs showing statistical results should be placed in an appendix. We welcome replications of existing papers, and are particularly open to “non-results”, which may be of great practical and scientific value yet are less likely to reach the audience of most academic journals.

Submissions and queries should be submitted to Prof. R. Frantz:

jbepsabe@gmail.com